"Life is too short to make bad art."

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Cartoon Cactus

After a not quite so smooth start into the new year - with health problems [starting to really get annoyed with those] and my work laptop dying on me [thanks to a dead graphics card] - I am finally back in the swing of things and working through the wish list of tutorials I received. 

Here's one from Andrea - a cartoon cactus - which happens to be an extra element I created for the BlockBuddies Cowboy Bundle.

I hope this is helpful, Andrea. Enjoy!


Get the source art (svg file) (does not include the BlockBuddies cowboy) of this tutorial for
USD 3.00

buy

16 comments:

  1. nice , but desert needs camel more than cactus :)

    good job hilden :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well done, that looks pretty good to me!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you very much Chris, this is so helpful!

    ReplyDelete
  4. great tutorials, keep working :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very Nice tutorial! I am making a 2D iPhone game and I am currently having a hard time with environment art(especially platforms). Could you make a tutorial on that?

    Keep up the awesome work!
    CharlesL

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm very impressed with your artwork, it's incredible, I'll use some tutorials in my actual and future android games. Please continue the good work.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey SpriteAttack, great tutorials. I'm glad I found your page. I am a programmer and horrible artist so I'm so happy to finally find some GOOD tutorials as most others are really old and outdated.

    I have a few questions though if you don't mind answering. First, how should you determine size of your assets when planning your game? For example most of the free tilesets you find around the net are either really old or ripped from old NES games and most of these are usually 16x16 which is extremely small and sometimes even hard to see. I assume this has to do with most older games using a restricted resolution based on screens and monitors of the time. What about now a days though with high resolution monitors and high def TV's having much larger resolutions, what would be an appropriate size and how should everything be scaled appropriately so things don't look disproportionate unless that was the designers intention. Secondly, if my size of tiles is say 32x32 or 64x64 should all other tiles and characters be of the same size or is it okay to have different size tilesets combined.

    When you create objects like houses and castles in games. I usually see these painted together in a tile editor and it seems as though buildings and other objects are composed of multiple tiles as well. How would these be created? Would you create an entire house or castle first and then in Photoshop or Gimp break the image into tiles and save out each image separately

    Also, wouldn't mind if you have the time, seeing a tutorial on creating interesting and cool background images which you can place on layers behind your tile sets and have them seamlessly for scrolling purposes. Also, some more tutorials on creating tilesets of different environments as well.

    Awesome work though, I love this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great tutorials! I have a request if possible Im trying to make a game and I was wondering if you can show how to make a texture atlas.

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hey man, your blog is like... Awesome XD

    Could you please teach us how to create platforms? (Ground underneath, grass above) (Ice platforms, etc.)

    I'm SOOOOO exited :D ^_^

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  10. @Stepehen Day - Yes... most of the tilesets derive from old games that had very restrictive hardware allowing limited colours and only small size blocks. I remember doing tileset in 8x8 pixels - something I wouldn't even be able to see on my current hi-res display. My suggestion would be to go big 64x64 or even bigger when creating the tiles and depending on the gameplay, engine, output resolution scale the tiles down later.
    I will keep those suggestions in mind and add them to the long list of tutorials to write.

    @Luis - Texture atlas... mmmmh... I am not sure I can cover that well as I usually rely on my coding buddies and their tools when 'packing up' the art,

    @Curious - I added those to the list. I have the art sitting here - a whole bunch of different platforms for 2D side view levels. I just need to find the time to pick them apart and write it up. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really like what what you're doing man...

      And I highly appreciated what you're doing (hope you enjoy it like, I don't, superb ;) )

      BTW, COOL blog ;)

      Delete
  11. When I try to make it a L-shape a triangle thing stretches between them. How can I fix it?

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am having the same issue as Bob. Any ideas would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Could it be the fill? Inkscape creates a 'closed' shape for the fill - even without the missing diagonal line. Turn the shape to no-fill and the triangle will disappear.

      Delete
  13. Can I ask what program or software did you use?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For these tutorials I use only inkscape and gimp as they are both free and very powerful.

      Delete