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Create clouds using circles in Affinity Designer

This an altered version of the inkscape tutorial on creating clouds. It shows the workflow of the previous Inkscape tutorial in Affinity Designer (by Serif). I am using the free beta version 1.5.0.5 for windows in this tutorial.

The main changes are the names of the tools, the short-cuts and minor differences in the way the tools work. 

So... let's get started with circles or as Affinity Designer calls them - ellipses. Keep in mind that this is just one way to do it and you might prefer hand-drawing them or using the pen tool and creating the curves manually.

I quite often use these 'quick clouds' for layered backgrounds - usually with a few layers of mountains, trees or even city skylines on a layer on top. 



Chris Hildenbrand

2D game artist, pixelpusher, vector bender, face turner for over thirty years. I worked on more games than I can remember... The most recent release is "Super Crossbar Challenge" for iOS (Android coming soon) with Shattered Box, Fredbear Games and PlayPlayFun.

7 comments:

  1. Recreating a tutorial for another software just one day later, you are the BEST!

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  2. too easy... It would be ideal to write the tutorial once and convert it to Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw and Affinity right away... and then go with different languages... but... seeing I do this for fun, there simply isn't enough time to do it all...

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  3. From your experience in Inkscape and Affinity designer, which software is better and easier than the other one ? :) :)

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    1. It's a little too early to say. I just started getting into Affinity Designer. There are some big pluses with that tool as far as usability, UX and UI goes. If you are starting with vector tools it's probably a little easier to get into Affinity Designer but it has some limitations in it's toolset where Inkscape offers solutions.

      I will write a more detailed review and a comparison of these two and some others in the very near future.

      If you have time, I would try both and see what feels better for you. If you just want to look into one tool and see if vector art works for you in the 1st place, I would suggest Affinity Designer as the more polished tool with the lower learning curve.

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    2. I will be waiting for your comparison of both softwares, Chris.

      From user interface point of view, of course, Affinity designer is much better, but unfortunately there is no linux version for it and that's one reason of many others why I am Inkscape big fan :) :)

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  4. I just ran into your g+ page, looking forward to seeing what you got, looks good soo far.

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  5. Will definitely give this a try, been creating my own portfolio in the last 6 months so I can use it to teach students from professional essay writing services some basic programming language.

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